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7 Poems by Maggie Royer That You Have to Read ...

By Michelle

My friend introduced me to various poems by Maggie Royer within the past few months and since then I have been devouring her work as fast as I can. Her poetry sparks emotion in its readers, communicating a feeling so vividly and accurately that readers everywhere take a step back in awe. She has two published books that I’m eager to get my hands on: Survival Songs and Healing Old Wounds with New Stitches. According to her Tumblr, Maggie Royer is 19 and “in love with words.” Her poetry shows that as it comes to life around you, evoking a response. These are some of my favorite poems by Maggie Royer that you have to read!

1 On Having a Boyfriend with OCD

Read it: writingsforwinter.tumblr.com

“On Having a Boyfriend with OCD,” a poem by Maggie Royer, has to be my personal favorite. She does a fantastic job painting the picture of OCD, specifically the calculated and precise nature of its actions. “He responded by trying to kiss me once, / then ended up kissing me twenty-three times, then once more / for an even twenty-four.” Though OCD doesn’t always manifest itself in counting, the poem speak to anyone who has encountered OCD on a personal or interpersonal way.

2 Origami

Read it: writingsforwinter.tumblr.com

My personal experience with an eating disorder inspires my love of the poem “Origami.” I can’t stand when people illustrate eating disorders as glamorous or desirable. I feel this poem by Maggie Royer does the illness justice in addressing how it affects not only yourself but others around you. The line about your esophagus being so acidic that it “leaves scorch marks on the person I care for the most” is hauntingly on point. I can remember lying to people close to me and feeling the bite of those words.

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3 Linguistics

Read it: writingsforwinter.tumblr.com

I grew up in a family fascinated by linguistics. My sister is a polyglot who studies German at college amongst various other languages in her free-time. My mother is fluent in Greek and I speak French. It’s only natural that I’m attracted to the Maggie Royer’s poem “Linguistics.” The poem starts off strong with the realization that there are combinations of words that are bullets ready to be fired at the ones you love. It makes me take a step back and consider the power words have from building someone up to tearing them down.

4 The Last Three Times Love Left

Read it: writingsforwinter.tumblr.com

Breakups are tough and can affect you in many different ways. The poem “The Last Three Times Love Left” powerfully illustrates three ways from bed-bound to rug-burned to blacking-out. I enjoy this poem because it’s raw and real, telling the story of so many who have been stabbed by love. It evokes beautiful imagery of the scent of disappointment and hope. You should definitely check this poem out!

5 Even if

Read it: writingsforwinter.tumblr.com

Rape is never okay. I’m sick and tired of hearing people talk about how it’s okay because of their clothing, intoxication or surrounding circumstances. I admire the poem “Even If” because it underscores the fact that it is never okay to rape someone. No words can do this poem justice. Read it for yourself and you will see how articulate Maggie Royer is in addressing this important issue.

6 When Love Was Blind, Literally

Read it: writingsforwinter.tumblr.com

Yet again Maggie Royer’s writing inspires me. She does an incredible job bringing to life the story of a homeless woman from Brooklyn who has known an intimacy more intense than ever before. The blind man “traded every bit of Braille for the smooth undersides of her knees...And there was another language in that, something wonderful / that transcended English or even Braille, / something that could never be translated.” Wow. Simply amazing.

7 No Shame in Being Sad

Read it: writingsforwinter.tumblr.com

We all experience sadness and loneliness. “But if I could tell you anything now, it would be this: / if your body is a map, there are places inside it you have never seen.” I’ve struggled with this own thought for years in my battle against mental illness, never able to accept that there is more to me than what meets the eye. The way Maggie Royer phrases this intangible concept grabs my attention and pulls me into the reality that there could be “the next great world wonder” located within my bones. All I have to do is being willing to explore it.

Maggie Royer is a phenomenal writer that you should definitely check out. You can purchase both her books, Survival Songs and Healing Old Wounds with New Stitches, online. What is your favorite poem by Maggie Royer?

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